skin infection

(In territories with significant traditional TRAMIL use)

Guatemala:

  • hierba del cáncer
Significant uses found by the TRAMIL surveys

  leaves, decoction, applied locally1

Recommandations Preparation and Dosage References (old input method)

According to published and other information:

Use for skin infections is classified as REC, based on the significant traditional use documented in the TRAMIL surveys, and on available published scientific information.

Do not ingest, due to danger of cyanide poisoning.  If poisoning occurs, seek medical attention.

For topical application, strict hygiene measures should be observed in order to avoid contamination or additional infection.

Should there be a notable worsening of the patient’s condition, or should the skin infection last more than 5 days, seek medical attention.

For skin infections:

Make an decoction, boiling for 5-10 minutes 30 g of fresh leaf in 1 liter of water.  Let sit, and filter.  Wash injury with purified water and soap, and apply the infusion in the form of a wash or a compress to the affected area 3 times a day.

1 GIRÓN LM, FREIRE V, ALONZO A, CÁCERES A, 1991
Encuesta TRAMIL (Costa atlántica). Ethnobotanical survey of the medicinal flora used by the Caribs of Guatemala. J Ethnopharmacol 34(2-3):173-187.

2 SOLÍS PN, RODRÍGUEZ N, ESPINOSA A, GUPTA MP, 2004
Estudio fitoquímico de algunas plantas TRAMIL con usos en Martinica. Informe TRAMIL. Centro de Investigaciones Farmacognósticas de la Flora Panameña CIFLORPAN, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Panamá, Panamá, Panamá.

3 DUKE JA, 1992
Handbook of phytochemical constituents of GRAS herbs and other economic plants. Boca Raton, USA: CRC Press.

4 PERUMAL SAMY R, IGNACIMUTHU S, RAJA DP, 1999
Preliminary screening of ethnomedicinal plants from India. J Ethnopharmacol 66(2):235-240.

5 FREIXA B, VILA R, VARGAS L, LOZANO N, ADZET T, CANIGUERAL S, 1980
Screening for antifungal activity of nineteen Latin American plants. Phytother Res 12(6):427-430.

6 POULTON J, KEELER R, TU T, 1983
Cyanogenic compounds in plants and their toxic effects. In: Keeler R, Tu AT, Eds. Handbook of natural toxins, Vol 1: Plant and Fungal Toxins. New York, USA: Marcel Dekker p117-157.

7 NAHRSTEDT A, 1987
Recent developments in chemistry, distribution and biology of the cyanogenic glycosides. In: Hostettmann K, Lea PJ, Eds. Biologically Active Natural Products. Oxford, England: Oxford Science Publications. p167-184,213-234.

8 CARRICONDE C, CARRICONDE D, 1987
De volta às raízes. Impresos (periódicos) del Centro Nordestino de Medicina Popular de Recife, Brasil.

9 ARGEHEORE EM, AGUNBIADE OO, 1991
The toxic effects of cassava (Manihot esculenta Grants) diets on humans: a review. Hum Toxicol 33(3):273-275.